FISCAL 2013: INSIDE SODEXO

Sodexo’s expertise drives local development
in Peru

Nearly 85% of Sodexo’s clients in Peru operate in remote, regional sites, many of which are under-developed. Through the Sodexo Association for Sustainable Development, Sodexo is contributing to the economic development of local communities, helping to build capacity in remote areas and boost local skills, production and prosperity.

At 4,300 meters above sea level and 200 kilometers from the nearest city, the Compañía Minera Antamina’s mining complex in the Ancash region of the Peruvian Andes is the definition of remote.

While the site produces ore concentrates of copper, zinc and molybdenum, among other valuable commodities, many of the local communities suffer from poverty, malnutrition and a general lack of development.

A mission to improve community development

The needs of communities such as Ancash are not being ignored by Sodexo. In 2004 the company established a community development association with the mission to improve the quality of life of people living in poverty in rural areas across the country.

“These communities don’t have schools or infrastructure, sanitation, or hospitals.” Carolina Rouillon, General Manager of the Sodexo Association

The Sodexo Association for Sustainable Development pursues three core development strategies: develop local workers’ skills for better employability, provide nutritional education, and strengthen local producers.

Carolina Rouillon, General Manager of the Sodexo Association, explains there is a high level of need in the rural communities where Sodexo’s client sites are located. “These communities don’t have schools or infrastructure, sanitation, or hospitals,”
she says.

Responsibility for development, she adds, often lies with the businesses in the area: “When Sodexo participates in a bid, an important part that we always include, and one that is always asked for, is a community development program.”

“In a bid we always include a community development program.” Carolina Rouillon, General Manager of the Sodexo Association

Leveraging Sodexo’s expertise

Moreover, while many local governments and businesses have the money and willingness to invest in local infrastructure, they lack the relevant know-how. This has created an opportunity for Sodexo.

By leveraging the Group’s expertise in food services, facilities management and nutrition, the Sodexo Association has been able to take the lead on development projects on behalf of its clients, adding a value to the relationship that extends beyond pure business.

Avocado business bears fruit

Antamina is a case in point. Since Sodexo’s relationship with the major mining company started 13 years ago with a contract to provide quality of life services at its mining site, it has blossomed thanks to a shared commitment to local development.

When Antamina recently forged links with a collective of avocado producers based on the country’s coast, it called on Sodexo to help. The Sodexo Association secured a facility where the avocados could be cleaned and packaged in accordance with the correct food hygiene standards, and coordinated the transportation logistics to bring the produce to the site.

The farmers now ship 100 kilograms of produce every week and Sodexo is exploring opportunities to bring their produce to some of its other client sites as well. Rouillon says the result has been a win for both the client and community. “Employees at the site think, ‘Wow – not only are we eating well, but our local producers are also benefiting’.”

By leveraging the Group’s expertise in food services, facilities management and nutrition, the Sodexo Association has been able to take the lead on development projects on behalf of its clients, adding a value to the relationship that extends beyond pure business.

perou-agriculture

Development initiatives across Peru

The Association currently leads 13 initiatives in 6 regions across the country, including 11 training centers where participants learn hospitality and maintenance skills with options ranging from employment on Sodexo projects or starting their own businesses.

Other initiatives include teaching people from local communities about healthy eating and food hygiene preparation to promote better nutrition, and helping local producers improve their processes and capacities in order to potentially supply Sodexo sites.

As Rouillon concludes, “the Association is working as a bridging link between the client and community through local engagement.”

A success story: Jaime Melgarejo, graduated from San Marcos School – Ancash.

Thanks to the Sodexo Association I learned how to offer good service and now own a restaurant: “El Junagan”. Today, the guys I hire as waiters come from the training school where I studied because I trust that they know how to serve customers.

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